Slides from OpenSouthCode 2016 session – Accenture DevOps Platform – open source continuous delivery

Today I’ve had the enormous honour and pleasure to present during the OpenSouthCode conference, held in Malaga, my own city, where I’ve been so fortunate to live and work since 1999.

I’ve been speaking about something I’m very proud to be a small part of: the Accenture DevOps Platform. An open source, continuous delivery platform with many unique aspects like fast stand up, easy maintenance, extensibility and resilience. Did I already mention it is open source? As it is incredibly brilliant!

I’d like to publicly thanks, once again, to the organisation for giving to me this unique opportunity of divulge about this piece of technology in my own city, and to the participants for their questions during and after the session.

For those that could not attend, or are just curious about what the Accenture DevOps Platform is, I’ve uploaded the slides to Slideshare here. They are written in English.

opensouthcode-adop

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Script to List Key Job Settings in Jenkins at a Glance

One can get addicted to scripting in Jenkins quickly! 😉

When you have dozens even hundreds of jobs in Jenkins, it is really important to have a way to review or change job settings in one shot. One of my favorite scripts, that I use when I want to get key settings from all jobs at a glance, is this one:

import hudson.model.*
import hudson.maven.*

for (job in Hudson.instance.items) {
  if (job instanceof MavenModuleSet) {
    mms = (MavenModuleSet) job
    def name = mms.name
    def jdk = "def"
    if (mms.JDK != null) {
      jdk = mms.JDK.name
    }
    def mvn = mms.mavenName
    def goals = mms.goals
    printf("%-50s | %-10s | %-15s | %-50s\n", name, jdk, mvn, goals)
  }
}

And this is a example output. I love it! 😀  (Be sure to scroll right to see full output.)

deors.demos.annotations.base                       | jdk-8      | null            | clean install                                     
deors.demos.annotations.base.client                | jdk-8      | null            | clean test                                        
deors.demos.annotations.base.processors            | jdk-8      | null            | clean install                                     
deors.demos.annotations.beaninfo                   | jdk-8      | null            | clean install                                     
deors.demos.annotations.beaninfo.client            | jdk-8      | null            | clean test                                        
deors.demos.annotations.beaninfo.processors        | jdk-8      | null            | clean install                                     
deors.demos.annotations.velocity.client            | jdk-8      | null            | clean test                                        
deors.demos.annotations.velocity.processors        | jdk-8      | null            | clean install                                     
deors.demos.batch.springbatch2                     | jdk-7      | maven-3.2.1     | clean verify                                      
deors.demos.cloud.gae                              | jdk-7      | maven-3.2.1     | clean verify                                      
deors.demos.cloud.heroku                           | jdk-7      | maven-3.2.1     | clean verify                                      
deors.demos.cloud.rhc                              | jdk-7      | maven-3.2.1     | clean verify                                      
deors.demos.cloud.vmc                              | jdk-7      | maven-3.2.1     | clean verify                                      
deors.demos.java8                                  | jdk-8      | maven-3.2.1     | clean verify                                      
deors.demos.testing.arquillian                     | jdk-7      | maven-3.2.1     | clean verify                                      
deors.demos.testing.arquillian-glassfish-embedded  | jdk-7      | null            | clean verify -Parquillian-glassfish-embedded      
deors.demos.testing.arquillian-glassfish-remote    | jdk-7      | null            | clean verify -Parquillian-glassfish-remote,!arquillian-glassfish-embedded
deors.demos.testing.arquillian-jboss-managed       | jdk-7      | null            | clean verify -Parquillian-jboss-managed,!arquillian-glassfish-embedded
deors.demos.testing.arquillian-jboss-remote        | jdk-7      | null            | clean verify -Parquillian-jboss-remote,!arquillian-glassfish-embedded
deors.demos.testing.arquillian-weld-embedded       | jdk-7      | null            | clean verify -Parquillian-weld-embedded,!arquillian-glassfish-embedded
deors.demos.testing.htmlunit                       | jdk-7      | maven-3.2.1     | clean verify                                      
deors.demos.testing.htmlunit-cargo-glassfish       | jdk-7      | null            | -P glassfish cargo:redeploy                       
deors.demos.testing.htmlunit-cargo-jboss           | jdk-7      | null            | -P jboss cargo:redeploy                           
deors.demos.testing.htmlunit-cargo-tomcat          | jdk-7      | null            | -P tomcat cargo:redeploy                          
deors.demos.testing.htmlunit-deploy-glassfish      | jdk-7      | null            | clean install                                     
deors.demos.testing.htmlunit-deploy-tomcat         | jdk-7      | null            | clean install                                     
deors.demos.testing.mocks                          | jdk-7      | maven-3.2.1     | clean verify                                      
deors.demos.testing.selenium                       | jdk-7      | maven-3.2.1     | clean verify                                      
deors.demos.testing.selenium-cargo-glassfish       | jdk-7      | null            | -P glassfish cargo:redeploy                       
deors.demos.testing.selenium-cargo-jboss           | jdk-7      | null            | -P jboss cargo:redeploy                           
deors.demos.testing.selenium-cargo-tomcat          | jdk-7      | null            | -P tomcat cargo:redeploy                          
deors.demos.testing.selenium-deploy-glassfish      | jdk-7      | null            | clean install                                     
deors.demos.testing.selenium-deploy-tomcat         | jdk-7      | null            | clean install                                     
deors.demos.web.gwt2                               | jdk-7      | maven-3.2.1     | clean verify                                      
deors.demos.web.gwt2spring                         | jdk-7      | maven-3.2.1     | clean verify                                      
deors.demos.web.springmvc3                         | jdk-7      | maven-3.2.1     | clean verify                                      
petclinic-1-build-test                             | jdk-7      | maven-3.2.1     | clean test                                        
petclinic-2-package                                | jdk-7      | null            | package -DskipTests=true                          
petclinic-3-tomcat-run                             | jdk-7      | null            | cargo:run -Pcargo-tomcat                          
petclinic-4-verify-selenium-htmlunit               | jdk-7      | maven-3.2.1     | failsafe:integration-test -P selenium-tests       
petclinic-5-verify-jmeter                          | jdk-7      | maven-3.2.1     | jmeter:jmeter -P jmeter-tests                     
petclinic-6-tomcat-stop                            | jdk-7      | null            | cargo:stop -Pcargo-tomcat                         
petclinic-9a-verify-selenium-openshift             | jdk-7      | maven-3.2.1     | failsafe:integration-test -P selenium-tests       
petclinic-9b-verify-selenium-heroku                | jdk-7      | maven-3.2.1     | failsafe:integration-test -P selenium-tests       
petclinic-full-all-browsers                        | jdk-7      | maven-3.2.1     | clean verify -P cargo-tomcat,selenium-tests       
petclinic-full-htmlunit-sonar                      | jdk-7      | maven-3.2.1     | clean verify -P cargo-tomcat,selenium-tests,jmeter-tests

Script to Update Jenkins Jobs to Use a Different Maven Instance

One of the features of Jenkins that I like a lot, very useful when you need to do bulk changes on your jobs configuration, is the script console.

The script console allows to run Groovy scripts that can read and alter the state of the jobs, or any other piece of configuration or state exposed through Jenkins API or through its plug-ins respective APIs.

Today I decided to take a look to Apache Maven 3.2.1 and I wanted to easily test all my existing jobs with this new version. As I’m “lazy” 😉 and didn’t want to update the jobs one by one, I created this script to do the job for me in no time. Hope you enjoy it!

import hudson.maven.*
import hudson.model.*
import hudson.tasks.*
import hudson.tools.*

oldMavenName = "maven-3.0.4"
newMavenName = "maven-3.2.1"

Maven.MavenInstallation oldMaven
Maven.MavenInstallation newMaven

// look for old and new Maven installations
// useful to detect that something is not well configured
for (ti in ToolInstallation.all()) {
  if (ti instanceof Maven.MavenInstallation.DescriptorImpl) {
    for (i in ti.installations) {
      if (i.name.equals(oldMavenName)) {
        oldMaven = i
      } else if (i.name.equals(newMavenName)) {
        newMaven = i
      }
    }
  }
}

println("migrating jobs from Maven: " + oldMaven.name)
println("to Maven: " + newMaven.name)
println()

// locate the jobs and update the Maven installation
// optionally filter them by some prefix or regex
for (job in Hudson.instance.items) {
  if (job instanceof MavenModuleSet) {
    mms = (MavenModuleSet) job
    if (mms.name.startsWith("some.prefix")) {
      println("job " + mms.name + " currently using: " + mms.mavenName)
      // if name is null, it means the default Maven installation
      if (mms.mavenName == null || mms.mavenName == oldMaven.name) {
        mms.mavenName = newMaven.name
        println(" migrate to: " + mms.mavenName)
      } else {
        println(" no migration needed")
      }
    }
  }
}

Code Coverage of Individual Tests with SonarQube and JaCoCo

This post explains how to enable SonarQube to gather test code coverage metrics of individual tests. Code coverage tools typically produce a report showing the code coverage (by line, branch, etc.) for the combined effect of all the tests executed during a given test session. This is case, for example, when you run unit tests in continuous integration. With the help of SonarQube and JaCoCo, it is possible to gather coverage metrics split at the level of the individual test case (test method in JUnit or TestNG). To enable this, there is some special configuration required that we are showing in this post.

The Environment

The following process has been verified with SonarQube 4.1.2 and 4.3.2 versions, but it should work with SonarQube 3.7.x (latest LTS release), too. The application code we have used to verify the setup is the familiar Spring Pet Clinic application, enhanced to support Tomcat 7 and Spring 3 (see this post here for reference on updates needed in Pet Clinic: https://deors.wordpress.com/2012/09/06/petclinic-tomcat-7/) The code can be downloaded from GitHub in the repository: https://github.com/deors/deors.demos.petclinic

The Instructions

The instructions are really simple, once you’ve figured out how to connect all the dots. All that is required is to add some specific configuration to Maven Surefire plug-in (Surefire is the plug-in that is tasked with the unit test execution, and it supports JUnit and TestNG). As this specific configuration should not impact the regular unit test execution, it is recommended to include the needed configuration in a separate profile that will be executed only when the SonarQube analysis is performed. Let’s describe the required changes in the pom.xml file, section by section.

Build Section

No changes are needed here. However, you should take note of any customised configuration of Maven Surefire to be sure it is also applied to the profile we are going to create. In the case of Spring Pet Clinic, this is the relevant portion of the POM we are writing down for reference:

<build><plugins>
...
 <plugin>
  <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
  <artifactId>maven-surefire-plugin</artifactId>
  <version>2.13</version>
  <configuration>
   <argLine>-XX:-UseSplitVerifier</argLine>
   <includes>
    <include>**/*Test.java</include>
    <include>**/*Tests.java</include>
   </includes>
   <excludes>
    <exclude>**/it/*IT.java</exclude>
   </excludes>
  </configuration>
 </plugin>
...
</plugins></build>

This piece of configuration is telling Surefire to: 1) exclude the integration tests for the execution of unit tests (integration tests are covered by Surefire’s twin plug-in, Failsafe); and 2) disable the byte code verifier, preventing runtime errors when classes are instrumented (i.e. when adding mocks, or TopLink enhancements).

Dependencies Section

Again no changes are needed in this section. We just wanted to note that if your project is already leveraging JaCoCo to gather integration test coverage metrics, and is explicitly referring to JaCoCo artefact in this section, it can be left – no conflicts have been identified so far. Anyway it should not be needed here, so it’s probably safer to remove it from this section.

Profiles Section

All the required changes come in this section. And they are very clean to add, as they all require only to add a new profile to the POM. This profile will configure a special listener for Surefire that will ensure that coverage metrics for each individual test case are appropriately gathered. To guarantee a successful test execution, we will maintain here the same configuration that appears in the build section of the POM. Finally, the profile will add a new dependency to the artefact that contains the listener code. The result is this:

<profile>
 <!-- calculate coverage metrics per test with SonarQube and JaCoCo -->
 <id>coverage-per-test</id>
  <build>
   <plugins>
    <plugin>
     <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
     <artifactId>maven-surefire-plugin</artifactId>
     <version>2.13</version>
     <configuration>
      <!-- same configuration as in the regular test execution goal -->
      <!-- plus argLine parameter configured by JaCoCo prepare-agent -->
      <argLine>${argLine} -XX:-UseSplitVerifier</argLine>
      <includes>
       <include>**/*Test.java</include>
       <include>**/*Tests.java</include>
      </includes>
      <excludes>
       <exclude>**/it/*IT.java</exclude>
      </excludes>
      <!-- new configuration needed for coverage per test -->
      <properties>
       <property>
        <name>listener</name>
         <value>org.sonar.java.jacoco.JUnitListener</value>
       </property>
      </properties>
     </configuration>
    </plugin>
   </plugins>
  </build>
 <dependencies>
  <dependency>
   <groupId>org.codehaus.sonar-plugins.java</groupId>
   <artifactId>sonar-jacoco-listeners</artifactId>
   <version>2.3</version>
   <scope>test</scope>
  </dependency>
 </dependencies>
</profile>

A piece of warning around the JaCoCo listener artefact version. Although it is unclear in the documentation, it seems that the best results are obtained when the JaCoCo listener version matches that of the Java plug-in installed in SonarQube. In this case, as the Java plug-in that we have installed in SonarQube is version 2.3, we have used the listener artefact version 2.3. We also tested with listener 1.2 with same good results, but to prevent any future conflict, we recommend keeping versions aligned.

Running the Analysis

Once the changes in the project configuration are done, you just need to re-execute a SonarQube analysis to see the new reports.

Depending on which SonarQube Java version you have installed, the configuration differs a bit.

Running the Analysis in Older Versions

When the Java plug-in version in use is 2.1 or an earlier version, the profile should be enabled when the analysis executes, and only when the analysis executes. This means that it is now a requirement to launch the sonar:sonar goal as a separate Maven build (it was recommended to do so, but in many cases you could execute all the targets in one run). In the case of our version of Pet Clinic:

>mvn clean verify -P cargo-tomcat,selenium-tests,jmeter-tests
>mvn sonar:sonar -P coverage-per-test

If your build is triggered by a Jenkins job, then the new profile should be added to the post-build action as can be seen in this screenshot: sonar-post-build

Running the Analysis in Newer Versions

When the Java plug-in version in use is 2.2 or newer, code coverage is no longer executed during the analysis. Therefore you should configure the build to gather the code coverage metrics first:

>mvn clean org.jacoco:jacoco-maven-plugin:0.7.0.201403182114:prepare-agentverify -P coverage-per-test,cargo-tomcat,selenium-tests,jmeter-tests
>mvn sonar:sonar -P coverage-per-test

If your build is triggered by a Jenkins job, then the JaCoCo prepare agent goal and the new profile should be added to the build action as can be seen in this screenshot:

sonar-maven-modern

Analysis Results

Once the analysis is completed, the code coverage reports get some new interesting views. When clicking on any test on the test view, a new column labelled ‘Covered Lines’ shows the individual hits for each test method in the class: sonar-test-summary When the link on Covered Lines value is followed, a new widget shows containing all the classes hit by that test method, and the touched lines per class: sonar-test-detail When the link under each of the classes is followed, a new widget appears showing the class source coloured with the actual line/branch hits:

sonar-test-code

Users can also get to this view if navigating through other views, as components or violations drill-down. Once the class level is reached, users can use the ‘Coverage’ tab to get this information:

sonar-class-coverage
By default, the decoration shown is ‘Lines to cover’, showing the code coverage from all tests combined. Use the drop-down list and select ‘Per test -> Covered lines’ and then select the right text case in the new drop-down list that will appear:
sonar-class-select-decoration
sonar-class-select-testcase
sonar-class-final

Conclusion

Measuring code coverage of individual tests is a very useful feature to have in development projects. Code coverage metrics alone may not be sufficient to identify that the rights tests are being executed and they are touching the right functionality. With the ability to identify which portions of the code are executed by any test case, developers and tester can ensure that the expected code logic is tested, versus what can be obtained with other code coverage tools that only gives a combined coverage report.

Installing Sonar in OpenShift as a DIY application

Note: this is an excerpt extracted from my talk at Red Hat Developer Day London. You can see more about the talk in my post here:

https://deors.wordpress.com/2012/10/03/developer-day/

Sonar is a popular code profiler and dashboard that excels when used along a Continuous Integration engine:

  • Seamless integration with Maven.
  • Leverages best-of-breed tools as Checkstyle, PMD or FindBugs.
  • Configurable quality profiles.
  • Re-execution of tests and test code coverage (UT, IT).
  • Design Structure Matrix analysis.
  • Flexible and highly customisable dashboard.
  • Actions plans / peer reviews.
  • Historic views / run charts.
  • Can be used with Java, .Net, C/C++, Groovy, PHP,…

Continue reading “Installing Sonar in OpenShift as a DIY application”

The Usual Suspects – Talk in Red Hat Developer Day London, Nov 1st

On Nov 1st, I will be presenting in Red Hat Developer Day London.

The tittle of my talk is: “The Usual Suspects – Creating a Cloud Development Environment with Sonar, Selenium and JMeter on OpenShift Origin“. During the session I will show how to extend the basic development environment offered by OpenShift (Git, Maven, Jenkins) and create a more powerful environment on OpenShift featuring “usual suspects” such as Sonar for continuous quality assurance, Selenium for functional testing, JMeter for performance/load testing as well as Arquillian for in-container testing. The session includes a live demo built on OpenShift Origin.

For more information about the event, full agenda and registration, visit: http://www.redhat.com/developerday/

See you there!

Edit 2012-11-01: These are the slides for the presentation. Meanwhile they are published in the conference site I have uploaded them here: The Usual Suspects – Red Hat Developer Day 2012-11-01

 

Test Automation with Selenium WebDriver and Selenium Grid – part 3: Continuous Integration

In part 1 in the series (read it here) I discussed about Selenium, the widely used tool for browser test automation, and I showed how easy is to setup a testing grid with multiple OS and browsers. In part 2 (read it here) I showed how to leverage WebDriver API to create and execute tests distributed across the grid that was created.

Now in part 3 I will show how to execute Selenium tests under a Continuous Integration process with Maven, Cargo and Jenkins, and how to gather code coverage metrics for those tests using Sonar and JaCoCo.

Continue reading “Test Automation with Selenium WebDriver and Selenium Grid – part 3: Continuous Integration”