10,000 visits!!

Today the blog has hit the 10,000 visits. I never thought this would happen one day, so I’m really really happy.

Thank you all.

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Test Automation with Selenium WebDriver and Selenium Grid – part 3: Continuous Integration

In part 1 in the series (read it here) I discussed about Selenium, the widely used tool for browser test automation, and I showed how easy is to setup a testing grid with multiple OS and browsers. In part 2 (read it here) I showed how to leverage WebDriver API to create and execute tests distributed across the grid that was created.

Now in part 3 I will show how to execute Selenium tests under a Continuous Integration process with Maven, Cargo and Jenkins, and how to gather code coverage metrics for those tests using Sonar and JaCoCo.

Continue reading “Test Automation with Selenium WebDriver and Selenium Grid – part 3: Continuous Integration”

Test Automation with Selenium WebDriver and Selenium Grid – part 2: Creating and Executing Tests

In part 1 in the series (read it here) I presented Selenium, a widely known tool for browser test automation.

Starting with Selenium 2, the most important components from the suite are Selenium WebDriver and Selenium Grid. In part 1 I showed how easy is to setup a testing grid with multiple OS and browsers. Now in part 2 I will show how to leverage WebDriver API to create and execute tests.

Continue reading “Test Automation with Selenium WebDriver and Selenium Grid – part 2: Creating and Executing Tests”

Test Automation with Selenium WebDriver and Selenium Grid – part 1: Setting Up the Grid

For a long while I’ve been “dying to play” with Selenium (www.seleniumhq.org and code.google.com/p/selenium/). I’ve heard and read very good things about this tool from colleagues and from the blogosphere.

Selenium is, in short, an open source tool to automate web browser interactions. A primary use case is, of course, browser test automation.

Selenium has greatly evolved with time, specially since the 2.0 release when the legacy Selenium project merged with Google’s WebDriver. Nowadays, Selenium offers a wide range of programming languages supported to write the tests, an impressive browser compatibility list, the ability to record tests from user interactions and, above it all in my opinion, the ability to re-execute tests across a grid of machines with various operating systems, browser families and versions.

Although Selenium seems to be primarily chosen for functional/regression test automation, it’s also a great choice – precisely because of the grid feature – for cross-browser compatibility testing: ensuring in an easy, cost-effective way, that our web applications are usable in all sorts of operating systems and browsers.

In this and forthcoming posts in a short series I will share my experiences setting up a Selenium Grid, building some automated tests for a simple Spring application, re-executing them from Eclipse IDE and finally re-executing them in continuous integration (including code coverage) with Maven, Cargo, Jenkins, Sonar and JaCoCo.

Continue reading “Test Automation with Selenium WebDriver and Selenium Grid – part 1: Setting Up the Grid”